Forty Shades of White, Orange and Brown: 40 Reasons to Praise Greater Manchester Transport

East of the M60‘s rundown of all things of a Greater Manchester Transport nature

8551 Leyland Atlantean ANA 551Y, Northern Counties body, Greater Manchester Transport (1981 livery)
Icon: bus, colour scheme and M-blem. Enough said.

Almost 40 years ago, the Lazy S of SELNEC would give way to the iconic M-blem. At one point, SELNEC’s successor was almost going to be known as ‘Manchester Metropolitan’ or ‘Metro’ (how much confusion would that have caused if the latter was adopted?), and have a different logo to the M-blem. Instead, also reflecting its influence from the newly formed Greater Manchester County Council, ‘Greater Manchester Transport’ was adopted.

Continue reading “Forty Shades of White, Orange and Brown: 40 Reasons to Praise Greater Manchester Transport”

Go Cheapway to… The Greater Manchester Museum of Transport

Exploring Greater Manchester’s transport history on a budget

Leyland Olympian NJA 568W, Greater Manchester Transport, Museum of Transport, Cheetham
Not to be missed: The Greater Manchester Museum of Transport is worth visiting from time to time, not only for new additions to its collection. On special event days, local preservation groups such as the SELNEC Preservation Society and private owners display their vehicles.

My first visit to this museum was on the Palm Sunday of 1986 with my father. We decided – rather wrong-headedly – to walk to and from the museum. On alighting our 220 bus at Victoria Station, we made the mistake of walking up Rochdale Road. In spite of the longer route which entailed turning left onto Queens Road, I still managed to catch a glimpse of the Red Bank carriage sidings. Continue reading “Go Cheapway to… The Greater Manchester Museum of Transport”

Right at the Heart of Things – Part Two: Tourist Attractions in 1980s Manchester

The second part of East of the M60 journey into 1980s Manchester

After spending too long in the Manchester of 2014, we shall return to the 1980s. This time, to the tourist attractions which put our city on the map – as today’s ‘must-visit’ destination for short breaks and day trips. Continue reading “Right at the Heart of Things – Part Two: Tourist Attractions in 1980s Manchester”

Right at the Heart of Things – Part One: Shopping in 1980s Manchester

East of the M60 travels back in time, to an era of a fully toilet tiled shopping centre

In the last week, I have been trying to imagine and recollect the joys of a trip through pre-1996 Manchester city centre. Some regular readers of this blog may be too young to remember the UK’s third/second/first/first and second city devoid of TESCO Express stores. Nor a Manchester devoid of Starbucks outlets and branches of Betfred. Or a Manchester free of white, orange and brown double decker buses. Continue reading “Right at the Heart of Things – Part One: Shopping in 1980s Manchester”

Like Crushing The Great Pyramids For Posh Hotels: Could the ConDems Close The World’s Oldest Railway Station?

A Cuts Scene Investigation Special: National Railway Museum, National Media Museum and Manchester Museum of Science and Industry to face closure or admission charges

NRM
Replica of Stephenson’s Rocket, outside the National Railway Museum, York. Photograph by Howard Longden (Creative Commons Attribution License-Some Rights Reserved)

The year is 2035. Manchester is connected to its recently opened High Speed Two line, which whisks Mancunians to the present day capital of the United Kingdom. It is possible to get a hourly HS2 service to London which takes 70 minutes. Elsewhere in the Greater Manchester City Region, it takes a similar amount of time to travel from Stockport to Ashton-under-Lyne by bus in the peaks on the 330 route. Continue reading “Like Crushing The Great Pyramids For Posh Hotels: Could the ConDems Close The World’s Oldest Railway Station?”