Stalybridge Whit Walks 2019, Trinity Street

One Answer to the Million Pound Question: the Stalybridge Heritage Walk

A possible approach to the Stalybridge Heritage Walk

In our previous article entitled The Million Pound Question: Stalybridge’s Historical Quarter, we looked at the story behind Tameside MBC’s successful bid. We also looked at how the heritage walk should form part of a greater scheme. In other words, how the Heritage Walk should be accompanied by prospective private and public sector development.

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Stalybridge Civic Hall, 2015

The Million Pound Question: Stalybridge’s Historical Quarter

Could the town’s rich history be a panacea for economic growth?

Stalybridge has a proud history. In spite of losing its town hall and the conversion of its market hall to a civic hall, there is still a lot to like about the Cheshire town. Especially Cheetham’s Park and the town centre’s equivalent of The Three Graces (Holy Trinity Church, Stalybridge Civic Hall, and the Astley Cheetham Art Gallery and Library).

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Tameside’s and Glossop’s Retail Highlights: Small Business Saturday 2017

02 December 2017, from a local shop near you, throughout the United Kingdom

For many people, taking a trip to the supermarket or retail park is the easy option. Choosing to stay at home and shop online is another. If you choose the aforementioned options, they make for a dull experience. The internet is a boom when you need to buy certain items but there’s no scope for impulse purchases. Continue reading “Tameside’s and Glossop’s Retail Highlights: Small Business Saturday 2017”

The View from Ridge Hill – Part Two: Our Town, Our Way

The concluding part of our series on the state of Stalybridge

Stalybridge sundial, Armentieres Square.
A sunnier outlook: could greater devolution unlock Stalybridge’s potential as The Gateway to the Pennines?

Friday 20 September 2014, Westminster. A typical work day, but a seminal moment North and South of the Border. A sigh of relief for the Coalition Government and Labour as the break up of the UK was postponed. In a referendum the previous Thursday, Scotland voted against independence from Westminster: 55% NO, 45% YES. Shortly after the result and in the run-up to the referendum, there was talk of greater devolution in England. In this case, its main urban areas, federal units, or an English parliament.

Continue reading “The View from Ridge Hill – Part Two: Our Town, Our Way”

The View from Ridge Hill – Part One: Whose Town Is It Anyway?

A two part series on the state of Stalybridge

Broken bus stop flag, Armentieres Square, Stalybridge
A Christmas Eve 2009 view of Armentieres Square shops, and a broken bus stop flag.

 

Monday 16 March, Stalybridge town centre. A typical work day, not that you were able to tell unless you went to the town’s Tesco store. Melbourne Street and Grosvenor Street, its main shopping streets: a place where the tumbleweed jumped ship years ago. Continue reading “The View from Ridge Hill – Part One: Whose Town Is It Anyway?”

The State of (Retail) Independence: Celebrating Small Business Saturday

06 December 2014, from a local shop near you, throughout the United Kingdom

Once upon a time, some five decades ago perhaps, there was no such thing as hulking supermarkets. Anything of comparable size to today’s traffic-thronged boxes would be the market hall of a major town or city such as Bolton, Ashton-under-Lyne, Leeds, Huddersfield or Sheffield. Unlike today’s supermarkets they were, and remain in many cases, icons of civic pride. Continue reading “The State of (Retail) Independence: Celebrating Small Business Saturday”

Countdown to Black Monday, 08 September 2014: Your Questions Answered

Everything you need to know about changes to evening peak fares this coming month

Class 153, Manchester Victoria, Platform 2
Another export from Workington: this stunning Class 153 which came from the same Lillyhall plant as your beloved Pacer unit in the previous article. Here’s the old roof, which is being dismantled and replaced by a new one. Paid for by yours truly, the squeezed commuter and even more squeezed casual traveller.

On hearing about the changes covered in our previous article, we at East of the M60 were aggrieved to say the least. Incensed because of the effects it would have on casual travellers. Fuming over this sanction being the most retrograde rail development in Greater Manchester since the arrival of the Class 142 Pacer unit. Continue reading “Countdown to Black Monday, 08 September 2014: Your Questions Answered”

DfT Imposes Evening Peak Restrictions on Northern Rail Users

Price of a cheap day trip set to double in September

  • Evening Ranger tickets face abolition;
  • Blow for Northern English nighttime economy;
  • Changes set to boost Metrolink patronage and increase road congestion.

Class 142 Pacer DMU, Manchester Piccadilly, post-rush hour
See this Pacer unit here: you’ve paid for this when it was one of many Leyland’s Nationals from Workington. Then you paid for British Rail to convert it into a DMU. Guess what? From early September, you’ll be paying even more for it if you wish to travel after 4pm!

From the 08 September, the price of a short train journey between 4.00 to 6.30pm is set to double on weekdays. Passengers wishing to travel by train throughout the Transport for Greater Manchester, Metro West Yorkshire and Travel South Yorkshire will be unable to use Off-Peak Day Return tickets during the evening peak. Continue reading “DfT Imposes Evening Peak Restrictions on Northern Rail Users”

Cuts Scene Investigation: Why Driver Only Operation Just Wouldn’t DOO

Future franchisees for Northern English rail franchises could ditch conductor guards.

Stalybridge Station, signal gantry
The recently opened eastern signal gantry at Stalybridge, viewed from the eastern end of the Manchester platforms.

Stakeholder Consultation: TransPennine Express Rail Franchise and Northern Rail Franchise (Rail North, June 2014)

The Department for Transport’s consultation on the future of Northern English railway services could see the successors of Northern Rail and First/Keolis Transpennine Express being forced to make cutbacks. Though amidst rising patronage, the DfT has suggested within its 86 page report: Continue reading “Cuts Scene Investigation: Why Driver Only Operation Just Wouldn’t DOO”

A Crossrail for the North? Time to Be Bold

HS3 in any form may be good for Northern England, but the basics need to sorted out first.

Rail patronage is booming throughout the UK, in spite of repeated stories about rising fares and substandard rolling stock. Northern England, where the terms of Northern Rail’s original franchise stymied any growth forecast, has seen record rises in patronage. Some of which partly through subsidised local fares or through necessity on journeys hitherto covered by local bus routes. Continue reading “A Crossrail for the North? Time to Be Bold”