The Reshaping of our Railways: 3. All This, Rail Blue and Rationalisation Too

The third part of East of the M60’s report on the effects of its area’s railways before, during and after the publication of The Reshaping of British Railways

BR Mark II 2nd Class carriage interior
For many passengers, the public face of 1970s British Rail involved a Mark 2 carriage such as this TSO (Tourist Second Open) example on the East Lancashire Railway between Heywood and Bury (photographed more recently in 2010, alas). By then, Rail Blue was everywhere.

A new decade enabled British Rail to make a fresh start. Two years earlier, they got rid of steam by means of a send off one August through Manchester Victoria railway station. The 1948 vintage British Railways signs were gradually replaced by the Design Research Unit’s works with black Transport font on a minimalist background. It looked clean, pretty much a byproduct of Harold Wilson’s ‘white heat of technology’. By the 1970s, minimalism would soon be extended to its railway stations. The reason was more to do with cost cutting instead of a clamour for more modernism. Even so, it led to the survival of some services. Continue reading “The Reshaping of our Railways: 3. All This, Rail Blue and Rationalisation Too”